A.Philip Randolph statue

A. Philip Randolph statue, Ed Dwight, Union Station, Washington DC, public art

Public Art : A. Philip Randolph statue

Sculptor: © Ed Dwight

Sculptor's Website: www.eddwight.com

Description: A bronze statue of Asa Philip Randolph (April 15th, 1889 – May 16th, 1979) who was a leader in the African-American civil-rights movement and led the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, the first predominantly black labor union.

Inscription:

A.Philip Randolph

April 15, 1889 - May 16, 1979

Dedicated by the AFL-CIO to the
memory of A. Philip Randolph, America's
foremost black labor and civil rights
leader. The founder of the Brotherhood
of sleeping car porters, he conceived
and initiated the 1963 march on
Washington for jobs and freedom.

"At the banquet table of nature there are no
reserved seats. You get what you can take , and
you keep what you can hold. If you can't take
anything you won't get anything and if you can't
hold anything, you won't keep anything. And
you can't take anything without organization."

A. Philip Randolph


Ed Dwight sculptor
1990

Date Unveiled: 1990

Location: The A.Philip Randolph statue can be found in the concourse of Union Station in Washington, D.C. USA.

Things You May Not Know About Asa Philip Randolph :

Randolph was born in Crescent City, Florida on April 15th, 1889.

It was Randolph's father who instilled in him that color was less important than a person's character and from his mother, he learned the importance of defending oneself (physically if necessary) against anyone who sought to harm.

Randolph moved to New York city in 1911 after finding it impossible to find anything other than manual work in the South, thanks to discrimination.

Randolph married Mrs. Lucille Campbell Green, a widow, Howard University graduate and entrepreneur in 1913 and soon after helped set up the Shakespearean Society in Harlem.

In 1963, Randolph was the head of the March on Washington at which Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his "I Have A Dream" speech.

 

Bookmark this page
Facebook Digg Stumbleupon Twitter Google Bookmarks Reddit

RSS  Public-Art-Around-The-World

 

If All Else Fails, Search!